www.DiscGolfersR.Us

The Community of Disc Golfers and About All Things Disc Golf

It seems that the sport as a whole is starting to really take off, more and more people are getting involved, and there seem to be a lot more places to play than there were 10 years ago. That being said, it seems like DG is missing a real universal sense of community. I have been hearing a lot of people's frustrations with the PDGA. Just wondering what everyone thinks about where the sport is headed, and what complaints there are now about organizations (or lack of organizations) out there.

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Bdizzle, I am not aiming this at you, because I don't think this is your intent. But I want to get the discgolfersR.us perspective, and my guidelines, out there at the beginning of this type of conversation - if for no other reason than it is my opinion that it was this type of discussion that led to the poisoning of the PDGA DISCussion board.

Generic PDGA bashing will not be tolerated in this network. Legitimate and fair criticism is fine, but name-calling, or allegation of "facts" without supporting evidence (generalizations like "the PDGA sucks" or that there is an "old boys network") are not acceptable. If such appear, they will quickly disappear, so be precise in what you write, folks. Some people do have some frustrations with the PDGA. But on this network, they will be appropriately communicated and in ways that keep the discussion comfortable for whoever might read it.
Most definitely agree Terry. Not at all trying to start any bashing, just trying to get some ideas about where disc golfers see the sport headed, and just how bright the future for this great sport is. I love the sense of community this site brings and i hope they start to pop up all over. I've seen the PDGA do a lot of really great things, and i don't think we would be where we are as a sport without them.

I would really like to see a site or sites that attempt to broaden the scope of disc golf to include those not familiar with the sport but who would like to get involved.
I am glad there is at least an organization trying. Every organization has its issue. If it wasn't for the PDGA I don't think we would be as far as we are. Anybody is welcomed in starting another organization (AFL-NFL-XFL-USFL I know there were more than that just can't remember them right now), run for office or make their thoughts know directly to the PDGA and members .
One thing that Terry didn't point out that should be mentioned is that outside the PDGA MB, there "is" a real feeling of community within the sport. Most of the guys I talk with don't have anything to do with the PDGA MB and they only see the PDGA the way they should, as an organizing structure. Those people, who play for the love of the sport, worry a whole lot less about this than many who are posting about this issue.


Another thing we should all be aware of is that the PDGA MB is being used as a political platform - effectively so. That use, as Terry pointed out, has IMO contaminated the PDGA MB. It can be an incredibly unpleasant place to go despite it's obvious value.

Last point, in response to the initial post, no sport without a large community effort grows like this one is. That is the real testament. I think that what people really mean is why isn't there a multi-million dollar controlling agency with a written plan? Part of the reason I like this sport is because there isn't a multi-million dollar controlling agency with a written plan. We grow at the grass roots level out of love of the sport, because we are a community.
I definitely agree with you on your last point about the grass roots growth of disc golf. there is definitely a great vibe surrounding the whole sport, and i certainly want to see that continue to flourish. In my initial post, i merely was asking what everyone's thoughts were on connecting all of these small communities that exist all over the country, and the world. That doesn't mean it doesn't have to be on a grass roots level, and certainly doesn't mean there has to be some million dollar agency controlling everything
I thought that was your intent, Bdizzle, and sorry for our digression to ward off evil spirits :)
I've had the privilege of meeting disc golfers from all over the place at worlds, and in places all over the US at other events. I know of nothing like the sense of community in disc golf, except for the sense of community in some religious communities. And in disc golf, that sense of community (a) transcends physical boundaries so easily, going way beyond people who worship in the same physical place and (b) isn't in the least based on any sense of being better, or of excluding others, being afraid of the influence of others, or in any way wanting to tell others how to live.

What we have in disc golf is pretty special in those terms alone.

When you add in that disc golf is by and large environmentally friendly, a healthy form of exercise for all ages, can be as relaxed or competitive as you wish, is inexpensive and wonderfully egalitarian (free of class consciousness), then you kind of have to start wondering why it isn't a religion. :)

I can't help it. I keep dancing around it, but I wonder if this network isn't already beginning to facilitate a more universal connection? No one has to pay dues here. PDGA members and non-members are joining. Daily I hear from people who are so pleased (no more than me) that they are able to reconnect with friends here, or make new ones. I have no intent to make this the be-all and end-all, but if not discgolfersR.us, then what? How could I ensure that this network encourages stronger connections?
No worries Terry, you've got a great thing going here, and I'm happy to be part of it. I enjoying engaging conversations such as this one we have going here, and i love hearing the feedback from people from all over the world (Australia!). I am relatively new to the sport and it's great to hear the input and feedback from members of discgolfersR.us.

I've been thinking a lot lately about how to further unite this increasing more tight-nit community, about putting on more amazing events in more places, and about purchasing land to develop more dream courses.

I ask all questions with no malicious intent (I actually just joined the PDGA), just the same curiosity that got me in trouble as a kid and has gotten me everywhere in life since.

Thank you for your enlightening response, I look forward to many more educational conversations like this one. Oh, and since I am new to the site, I friend requested you too!
Hey guys,

Great discussion you've got going here. From the point of view of an International player, I think that both the PDGA and this site have done amazing things in both bringing the sport into the mainstream, and creating a sense of community. Being that the vast majority of the focus on disc golf is on the US scene, I think it's very difficult for players in countries like mine (Australia) to feel like we're a part of the disc golf community. However, this is changing at a rapid rate. The sport here is not very large at the moment, so its good to be able to jump on here and chat about various disc golf-related things with other players around the world, and another benefit (particularly on this site) is having direct contact with the pros, which is something that not many fans of other sports would be able to boast!

There are always critics; as the old saying goes, "you can't make everyone happy all the time". It takes an incredible amount of commitment, sacrifice and dedication to make a web community like this one, or especially a worldwide sporting association like the PDGA become successful, and I salute the people responsible. To me, if something frustrates you, then the best way to fix it is to get involved yourself and become the solution, not another problem. Unfortunately too many people are content to sit back and sling mud, which doesn't really solve anything, and potentially discourages the people who are making sacrifices for the good of the sport. These people are the people who lobby local councils to install and maintain new courses (or they open private ones), they introduce new people to the sport, they sell/supply equipment, they establish and volunteer to help run local clubs, tournaments etc. Whether you are a serious tournament player or a casual player who throws every couple of weeks, these people are the bricks & mortar that will enable disc golf to build into an immensely popular sport, which has the potential to be enjoyed by millions worldwide.

It is a necessity that we have a governing body for the sport that will provide a democratic unified voice on the political side, and it is also necessary that we develop a strong disc golf community which enables the sport to continue growing. If we can't maintain both these concepts, the sport would not survive for long. However, the sport has an amazing future for a multitude of reasons, and it is an exciting time to be a part one of the fastest growing sports in the world!

I'm looking forward to the day when someone asks me what sports I play, and when I answer disc golf, instead of getting confused looks and a lot of questions, I'll get a response like: "Oh yeah, I play too. What's your home course? Want to catch up for a round soon?". Thats my idea of where we should be aiming to be.

Kris.
Terry is right on here Bdizzle. Relatively speaking, I'm new to the sport, that is, I've been playing about 10 years. In Houston, if you spend any time with the old time guys (playing 20 years or so) they know everyone. They know Dunipace, they know Dave Mac and on and on. They actually have the community that you're discussing. Now, us newbies aren't part of that, yet, but I can see it. I can see it in what the oldest members of the sport can do in terms of support and favors. These guys do things that support and grow the sport and events.

That community was grown on the course. It was grown by guys that traveled and played. It has nothing to do with the internet or what happens here. It has nothing to do with DGWN or FDS. It's about face to face relationships.

The fact is that the best way for us to grow this sport is to get out to events (especially the big ones) where the very best players and supporters play and visit. Ask those guys what you can do or offer to help them in their efforts. That is how our community grows.

Let me give you a direct example. I remember the first time I met Dez and Yeti. It was at Texas States. They were sitting in the parking lot telling stories and talking about what they liked about the sport. I thought "man, those guys are great!" It made me step up into a number of volunteer roles (that and a feeling like I owed the locals who grew the sport here).

The more we do this, the more we talk, in person and where we're doing what we love, the better this sport will be.

Volunteer, locally, talk to people who've been around and see what they're doing. That is the key to our community.

Last, I also over spoke. So many are trashing the sport on the internet without thinking about what has and is being done that it makes me... testy. There is so much good that is happening that those people never bother to look at.
I'm with you Lyle O. You've definitely nailed it here. Instead of typing it all over again, see how I responded to Terry. I understand wanting to defend the sport, there is so much going on, and i want to be a big part of it. I only ask these questions to better determine what i can do to contribute to this great sport. I think you did a great job of capturing the nature and community within the sport here, and that is what i want to see flourish to more and more areas.
Hey there. I just want to give a little perspective from up north in Canada. By the standards set here i too am a relative newcomer to disc golf. I have been playing 7 years and like most of us here am totally in love with the game. I have been playing in non-official tournaments for the last few years and trying to meet as many people in this world as I possibly can. I love it, most people I introduce to the game love it. It is virtually free, what is not to love. We are actively growing the game here in Canada. There is a network already formed that is growing rapidly, from the grass roots up. The catch is, in order for towns, or municapalities to invest in the game they rely on a governing "official" body. This is both a blessing and a curse. As the game grows in popularity there is an increasing need for organization. However, this is what I think sets this game apart for most others. Because you can play for free you can organize for free. The community can congragate and 'worship' for free. Many people in this sport love it for this reason. I can play with my family (many of whom are under 16) and not worry that we are interfering with others on the course. People are generally happy to share the course and are not afraid of making new friends.

If there is a complaint about other organizations, it comes for the fact that sometimes 'memberships' are seen as status. Ranks and history are more important then personality. I recently bought 9 disc catcher baskets with a friend and have set up a course in the backyard of the house I grew up in. We are Nova Scotia's first disc golf course. We registered a business to design courses and have taught school PE classes and done free demonstrations. We have been on the evening news and front pages of local papers. The game is contagious. Often times the communities grow WITH the courses. In our business outline we note that a good course is built and maintained by the same group who use it. This makes our game special.

This is a life style and attitude as much as a game. People who play know it, and the ones who haven't played will soon find out why this is such a special game.

Cheers from the great white North
Ok so to answer the Question (Where is the sport going?) I can answer that By my point of view.
I have been playing and reading about the sport for about ten years now. Well really the first time I played was around 27 years ago in 1981 but we just called it that frizbee game or frizbee golf. I really started play disc though in Indiana with the tippicanoe disc gold club . and logan sport barking tree frogs.lol Joined the PDGA # 18712 and started reading DGWN. the same problems we have now we had back then . Sure we do now have DGTV and a few other media outlets but really who see them but Disc golfers. we still haven't hit main streem . Every once and a while you will see a newspaper article about an Ice bowl or other tourney . may even make the local news. We might get lucky to see our sport on ESPN for about 20 whole seconds as a quick breez over in a sports news segment . But really who we foolin? We are not main streem and we won't be for a long time.

Some thing major needs to happen for Disc golf to fully move forward as a publicly cared about sport. What? I have no Idea. Maybe we need to stop drinking on the courses and smoking in the woods. Maybe we need Pay to play courses. (I shutter at the thought) Maybe we need to really Invest into one huge tourney . find some huge sponcers like buick or Nike and get a huge tv block On a channle lower than 356 or ESPN 3 , Something like fox sports and really have a big purse and shove the sport into the faces of the public like every other new sport. How did they get Snowboarding to grow as fast as it did with its own Xgames ?

Think about it the sport of Disc golf is going about a snails pace forward . Might as well be one step forward and two steps back at this rate.

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