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I know the heavier the more stable. What else is different about the flight of a heavy vs. light disc of the same kind? Anybody know?

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I've always found that 3 grams makes a noticible difference... to me at least. Big headwind, I throw heavy stable plastic...Big tailwind...light understable stuff. Of course that all depends on what I'm trying to accomplish, i.e. where I want to land, and the features of the fairway and/or hazards.
Exactly !!!!! Depends on the Disc and weather conditions.
It really does at over 1-2 g, because it affects rotation and speed, resistance. Don't expect a disc to weigh what it says though, they are so off you can never be that sure until you weigh it yourself.
Alright, weight is, in my opinion the most important factor in buying a disc. Especially when throwing the discs considered ultra long range distance drivers. These discs have huge rims, which are growing and growing. This can only lead to one thing, more weight being put at the outside of the disc.

Divers, gymnasts, and skaters all do one thing to make themselves spin faster, pull their arms in. This can be seen on every twist move they preform. They also put them out to slow them down, and provide more stability. It is a law of physics which that most people probably know.

I find that, especially in "premium" plastics, like Star and ESP, that weight distribution can be a problem. A big one. When I buy a disc, I always go through a check of where I think the weight is distributed. This is why I only throw discs that have a little weight in the center of the disc, you can find this on X-Cals pretty easy, but then in a pretty high weight so that the big rim can help stabilize, and I kid you not, slow the spin of the disc. This does slow the speed the disc will travel about half way through it's flight, because it will be spinning significantly slower and increasing drag. This is contrary to many of my throwing buddies, they'd rather have a lighter disc, so that the rim is lighter, and the disc can spin faster.

This leads to the question of what works better for different people. I am personally a rather strong person. I am in no way trying to sound arrogant, but it's just kind of a fact. I have always been, and I think that roping has increased my wrist strength significantly, I can't say that football and what not has hurt either. It's because of this that I can get away with some OAT and increased rate of deceleration. I simply get the disc out there a lot further before it starts to slow for some people. So, if you think you're like me, you can muscle the disc, you will probably like the heavier drivers.

However, my friend, who is lighter person, he runs, avidly, throws just as far with lighter discs and a different throwing style. He is much more about control, and he uses lighter discs. The discs do seem to come out of his hand slower, but they also seem to die a lot slower. He has longer arms to, and I think this can contribute. I think that he's probably got a form and throwing philosophy that is more efficient, but people are different.

So, I can't stress how important weight really is in terms of how it affects the disc, but it is finding what works for you personally.

This is strictly for the distance discs. When it comes to mids and putters, where it is much more about control because you know you have the distance, it's more about what you personally feel you have more control over.
For the average arm disc golfer, IMO a max weight driver is more accurate and has less distance. Where as a lighter driver can be thrown farther but is less accurate. Remember, if you are an Innova thrower some of the weights can be as much as 8 grams off. My main tailwind/general purpose drivers are in the 168 gram range. I use 175 Firebirds and Destroyers though. Hope this helps.
heavier weight disc= more fade
lighter weight disc sometimes glide more
lighter weights you can get more distance with less power and it will sail threw the air, but on windy days lighter discs are easier to be disrupted. heavier discs are good for windy days, stronger armed people. it really depends on your arm power, weather, where you want it to end up, and what type of shot you have in front of you. no matter if its lighter or heavier the disc will do its job if thrown properly
I used to throw everything at maximum weight because the good pros I hung around all threw max weight. When I started testing discs for Discraft, sometimes the new prototypes were light weights. Sometimes the protos weren't even weighed. The more I tested discs the more I realized that weights are not a big deal. Who cares what a disc weighs if it flies well?

I throw forehand with solid power and need overstable drivers. Through the years my primary drivers have been X-clones, Banshees, Firebirds and Crushes. Flippy (understable) drivers do not handle my snap and flutter.

The general rule is that all other things being equal a heavier disc is more overstable. But the rule doesn't mean much because all other things are almost never equal. I have found that disc stability varies more based on the dominess of the flight plate (which affects the nose angle) than weight. I have also found that the color of the disc (within the same run) affects the stability of a disc more than the weight.

Now once I find a run of discs that work well for me, it is my hope to find a disc in the low 170's or high 160's that I like. Within 10 grams or so the weight doesn't seem to matter much and it is a little easier on my arm to throw lighter stuff.
Good posts so far. Seems like some of the newer, faster drivers are a little weight neutral meaning that they are so fast and cut through the wind so well that weight is less of a concern. It use to be, throwing a 170g disc into a headwind was "bad form" but the discs can take it now. Could be a combination of newer discs and loss of some power for me though. Good question.
mark ellis said:
...I have also found that the color of the disc (within the same run) affects the stability of a disc more than the weight.

How interesting, and I've never heard this. I have to ask, which colors are less stable, and can you explain why? I've been buying a random rainbow of disc colors so it's easy to distinguish them at a glance, but your comment makes me think maybe I should change my strategy.
I dont believe the heavy the more stable??? i have a 167 Wraith that is so overstable it is a joke.
i believe white to be the most stable.
Lewis Wilson said:
mark ellis said:
...I have also found that the color of the disc (within the same run) affects the stability of a disc more than the weight.

How interesting, and I've never heard this. I have to ask, which colors are less stable, and can you explain why? I've been buying a random rainbow of disc colors so it's easy to distinguish them at a glance, but your comment makes me think maybe I should change my strategy.

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