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Jlotto has been telling me about the discs he's starting to use. He said he was sick of buying discs online and at party stores so he started experimenting around with some materials around the house. I guess somebody told him the ultimate homemade-disc compound: Beeswax and Drywall Sealer. He said its grippier than ESP and a little less durable. I think he uses heat to get some sort of chemical reaction. Anyway I guess he can throw these discs 50' farther than his old favorites and they stick to the chains. Anyone know anything about this?

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Having recently replaced the BEEZWAX sealer on the bottom of my toilet I can say that YES it is Sticky
I am not sure I want to toss one of them around. It would leave me feeling like FlyPAPER.
I am sure there are formula's around that can coat a disc in places to get that Sticky edge feel such as Silicon Tub Surround or maybe DAVES Flexcoat cement (Found in Fly tying supply shops) that could provide GRIP without Grime.
If its Chain Gripping CLING you seek I think you buy a Rattler or a Magnet for about half the price it may cost to make one.
Glen Atwell said:
Having recently replaced the BEEZWAX sealer on the bottom of my toilet I can say that YES it is Sticky
I am not sure I want to toss one of them around. It would leave me feeling like FlyPAPER.
I am sure there are formula's around that can coat a disc in places to get that Sticky edge feel such as Silicon Tub Surround or maybe DAVES Flexcoat cement (Found in Fly tying supply shops) that could provide GRIP without Grime.
If its Chain Gripping CLING you seek I think you buy a Rattler or a Magnet for about half the price it may cost to make one.

it only costs my precious time. i live on a bee farm and i workfor a major drywall company in my city.
Yes, well similiar. Made in the same process, Hemp and a Phenolic material made from phermaldehyde resin called TUFNOL (google it) , but the disc was very ridgid, i'm sure with the beeswax added in the right percentage (measuring parts/grams of resin) or dry wall sealer you could adjust the ridgidity or softness of the disc.

Blaze said:
wow thanks a lot for explaining that. i have personally never heard of that until now. have you ever thrown a disc made out of this compound?

Mike said:
Yeah, I have heard of that. It's just like compression molding with thermoset polymers, such as heat resistant plastic parts that you find under your car hood. The bees wax and drywall molecules cross-link under high pressure and heat such as a heated platen mold inside of an Arbor Press. Once the cross-linking bond is created it transforms into a solid part.
so when do we get a picture?
no, just smartest and most innovative.


That's just the politically correct version...Ha!
In my other Sporting interests I restore Old Bamboo fishing rods- because I can- and in the Old days before Plastics they used Alcohol and Shellac and resins to coat not only the Bamboo Fishing poles but the SILK lines as well. It makes for a very flexible and strong material not all that far from Polyurathane in feel. There are Dozens of DRY Shellacs that you can buy - try Lee Valley Tools- and melt down in a pot. Bees Wax was part of the secret Formula many Fly Fishers used in their skills to keep their lines floating.
Somewhere in this Alchemy of Sages long lost I bet you will find something useful. Disc ON!

joshlotto said:
Glen Atwell said:
Having recently replaced the BEEZWAX sealer on the bottom of my toilet I can say that YES it is Sticky
I am not sure I want to toss one of them around. It would leave me feeling like FlyPAPER.
I am sure there are formula's around that can coat a disc in places to get that Sticky edge feel such as Silicon Tub Surround or maybe DAVES Flexcoat cement (Found in Fly tying supply shops) that could provide GRIP without Grime.
If its Chain Gripping CLING you seek I think you buy a Rattler or a Magnet for about half the price it may cost to make one.

it only costs my precious time. i live on a bee farm and i workfor a major drywall company in my city.
Any Pictures ?
Donny Olow said:
Any Pictures ?

when i dye one that looks sweet ill take a pic.
i couldn't help but try this method of creating a disc, i didn't believe it at first that it could actually make a disc fly fifty feet further.

i didn't have any beeswax handy (imagine that!) but i had some candles that i was able to melt in the microwave in a plastic bowl (six minutes on high for 14 tea candles was enough to liquefy the wax). i then stirred some drywall sealer that i had bought from home depot (Zinsser 02301 Gardz Drywall Sealer). The mixture I used was about 60% candle wax and 40% drywall sealer. At first, however, the two ingredients did not mix at all. i began to lose hope, but tried heating them up together on the stove. this proved to be necessary, as a few minutes of cooking the mixture on high and stirring throughout allowed the materials to somehow bond (probably what mike was talking about). however, it was difficult to mold the mix into a disc. i originally poured the liquid into a frisbee, planning on molding it by hand until it was solidified. however, it was far too hot to touch. i tried to use a big spoon to shape it, but the frisbee had melted by the time i thought of this. as it cooled off and began to solidify, i was able to make something that resembled a disc shape and size. in the process, however, i have ruined a pot, a frisbee, and my kitchen counter, and i have first degree burns on four fingertips.

the result was a disc that seems to be extra "sticky" and slightly heavier than a normal disc. i think your friend is definitely on to something, but i don't recommend using the method i employed. please ask your friend what the percentage of each compound should be used in the mixture and how he was able to mold a disc from the goo. i will gladly try again once this information is available.

-the deity of discing
I don't know, I still don't believe him. I don't need to see a dyed disc, I wanna see what the raw product looks like...

joshlotto said:
Donny Olow said:
Any Pictures ?

when i dye one that looks sweet ill take a pic.
This is a very intriguing subject which I unfortunately know nothing about, so I shall be following this one closely. And YES!! We need to see some quality pictures of this in order to dig even further.
Well he will not tell exactly what he is doing for his process. However, from what I have gathered/beat out of him is that he is using somthing like an arbor press with heated platens. This type of process requires the properties of the beeswax and a specific type of industrial drywall sealer. The materials are placed seperatly in the mold then the pressure (im guessing between 2-6 thousand lbs/sq) about what I have seen used before) and heat that is generated between the mold halves (350-425 deg. F) creates the chemical reaction called cross-linking when the molecules bond together. This is similar to the reaction you see with 2 part epoxies that you can buy, they generate heat when combined and that is when the reaction takes place. You definately need the right materials and setup to produce one, which from what he told me I believe he does.
barry said:
i couldn't help but try this method of creating a disc, i didn't believe it at first that it could actually make a disc fly fifty feet further.

i didn't have any beeswax handy (imagine that!) but i had some candles that i was able to melt in the microwave in a plastic bowl (six minutes on high for 14 tea candles was enough to liquefy the wax). i then stirred some drywall sealer that i had bought from home depot (Zinsser 02301 Gardz Drywall Sealer). The mixture I used was about 60% candle wax and 40% drywall sealer. At first, however, the two ingredients did not mix at all. i began to lose hope, but tried heating them up together on the stove. this proved to be necessary, as a few minutes of cooking the mixture on high and stirring throughout allowed the materials to somehow bond (probably what mike was talking about). however, it was difficult to mold the mix into a disc. i originally poured the liquid into a frisbee, planning on molding it by hand until it was solidified. however, it was far too hot to touch. i tried to use a big spoon to shape it, but the frisbee had melted by the time i thought of this. as it cooled off and began to solidify, i was able to make something that resembled a disc shape and size. in the process, however, i have ruined a pot, a frisbee, and my kitchen counter, and i have first degree burns on four fingertips.

the result was a disc that seems to be extra "sticky" and slightly heavier than a normal disc. i think your friend is definitely on to something, but i don't recommend using the method i employed. please ask your friend what the percentage of each compound should be used in the mixture and how he was able to mold a disc from the goo. i will gladly try again once this information is available.

-the deity of discing

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