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We had a good discussion on our local club site on this.. so thought I would open it up to the world! It was really great to have some 1000+ rated players give their input.


Since I have been observing the challenge to play within this rule myself, I better understand (1.)how it adds a greater degree of difficulty to the game, and (2.)how it is violated randomly (however innocently) by many. Just this last week, Doug and I opted to pull out the rule book and start digging into the complexities of this rule ourselves, just for the added clarity.


As the topic implies, this is in regards one's 2nd shot. So I put it forth as a multi choice question.. even though, like I said, I know (all? the) Pros have already gone to some lengths to know it, and get it
down pat. On the other hand, it may be an eye-opener to some. In case
you don't want to accidentally see the answer.. I opted not to paste it at the
bottom.. like i did for our local forum.


-----------Situation-----
Jim Pro, John Master, and Grant Grasshopper are playing for $100 using PDGA rules. On a long par four, Grant Grasshopper had the shortest drive and is next to
throw from in the middle of the fairway. The three move as a group to
where Grant marks his lie correctly, and prepares for his next shot.
Grant intends to launch his 2nd shot with all the power he can muster,
so he backs up a few meters behind his marker to allow for an X-step
type of run-up that will finish with his lead foot closely behind the
line made by the back edge of his marker.


As he unleashes his throw, (let's say, Right handed Backhand) the toe of his right foot lands within one inche of his mini marker and is behind the imaginary line made by the back edge of the marker


However, at the point of release, not one part of his lead foot (or other foot) was directly behind any part of the (3 inch diameter) mini marker itself. Grant's toe of his lead foot simply landed perfectly within one inch of the right
side of the marker, without going beyond the marker's back edge.


While Grant is watching his disc fly through the air, Jim declares a stance violation on Grant, and John seconds the call. This is the first time anyone has declared such a violation in the round.


Grant looks down and sees that his foot happened to make a mark on the fairway to show exactly where his entire foot landed, obviously safely behind the line, and the toe was within just one inche of the
right side of his marker, (his heel was positioned further away from the
right side of his marker than his toe).

What happens next?

A. Grant points to the mark made by his foot, and indicates it is
well within the 11.8 inches allowed, and points out that he did not go
beyond the line of his marker. Play resumes with no violation.
B. Grant receives a warning, which does not add a stroke, and he plays on.
C. Grant takes a one stroke penalty and plays on.
D. Grant receives a warning, but must re-throw with another disc.
E. Grant receives a warning, but must re-throw, and can opt to use the disc he originally threw for the violation.
.
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@Motodom: The unofficial warning is usually the best way to go for MINOR infractions. Something to the effect of "you need to be closer to yer mark, next time it's a stroke. Sorry, I don't mean to be an asshole, but rules are rules."

Casual warnings for MINOR infractions are preferable ticky-tacky crap.
@Motodom: The unofficial warning is usually the best way to go for MINOR infractions. Something to the effect of "you need to be closer to yer mark, next time it's a stroke. Sorry, I don't mean to be an asshole, but rules are rules."

Casual warnings for MINOR infractions are preferable ticky-tacky crap.
Sorry for the double post.
Here's another (on one hand, or the the other hand).
Let's say that, using the example above, Grant has never ever known or thought about this rule before this day at this very first call.

From the prior discussion on our local forum, and just using common sense about athletics, it is safe to predict that Grant in the example above- throughout the rest of the holes for $100, will be somewhat handicapped to hit his mark cleanly.. if/when the shot involves a run up to a marker.

That is to say here, if it is day 1 on this rule, and suddenly one is trying to make sure they are touching what could be described as a 12" ruler behind your maker, in line with the basket, at the point of release, then it might be a little painful for everyone to call, and be called on, a succession of these type of foot faults.

(BTW, Here is a link to the local MT forum thread that has some interesting insights into what is probably the thought process of each stage of development in the mind of disc golfers on this..a lot of elements discussed, http://www.gardencityflyers.org/site/node/690 . more of the thread regarding this covers.. duty bound, speed of play, and this pic I put into the discussion there..

answer is D
The stance looks a little uncomfortable for the right knee.

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