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I am in the process of putting a course in at the house. I have a few acres in the back yard and noticed that I had a lot of dead trees, as I started cutting them down I started seeing fairways. Most of these will be 10-12 feet wide so it will be a fairly tight course. What do you think about fixing it so it can be played forward and backward? Or would multiple tees be better?

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Safety issues are much different for a home course versus a public course. On a public course, crossing fairways is a safety hazard. In your backyard, where you can regulate and/or limit the number of players it is a small and manageable risk. Private courses tend to get fewer total number of players on the course at a time and those players tend to know the course well and can anticipate flow and safety concerns.

If I were designing a private course and had limited space I would look to make the most options possible. So multiple tees, backwards holes, mandos, island holes, artificial OB and any other wild ideas I could invent would all be used.

Any tee or teeing area can be used for any basket. I would worry about protecting your home or other breakable or sensitive areas around your home. Keeping errant throws out of roads or adjacent neighbor's property are other concerns.

Installing and maintaining a course is a lot of work. To get back a good return on that effort you want maximum variety and fun. You also should purposely design holes which force you to improve on your weaknesses as a player. You may score better and win more on a course where every hole meshes with your strengths but you won't improve as much by playing it. If your course teaches you tight tunnels and overheads and rollers and anhyzers and skips and the pressure of island hole drives and elevated baskets then it teaches you the varied skills of the game, not just how to memorize a few shots.
yes I am keeping all parts of the course a hundred feet from the house. I hope nobody throws that much off line and the tree buffer should help as well it is a fairly thickly wooded area. now i have to figure out targets I was thinking about tone targets
We put 9 baskets in 8 acres and were able to make 18 holes (not reverse fairways just a different 9 using the same baskets) with short and long tees. It wouldn't work if it was open to the public/busy, but, it is not, so it's the best possible situation. We have a long truly challenging course with many shots, better than many other local public park courses, and it works for us because that is who it is for. We have the occasional tournament, but with a field cap of 45 (5 somes) and what you do is play 9 holes, stop, play the back 9.
Yes 7-8 ares is what I am working with, it is a fairly heavily wooded area with a lot of small trees in and amongst the larger trees. I am trying not to cut down any trees that are not dead, dying or damaged. I think I am going to try for 9 baskets 2 tees for each basket and the course to be able to be played backwards once so that would give me 27 holes
I'd leave as much vegetation as possible and criss cross holes like mad.

Why not if it's your own land?
I've seen a private course at a Boy Scout camp, which had nine holes with three different tee boxes for each hole, (red, white, and blue), and was very challenging. There were a lot for trees, so it was quite tight, but for a private course, it does not really matter. We called this course "Back Woods" and was just that. When you make the fairways narrow it can really develop your skills for finesse shots, so go for it!
___Tab
I guess "Private" can encompass different situations. If a course is "privately" owned but hosts lots of players (especially newbies) and tournaments then the safety design issues are the same as a public course.

Some of Michigan's finest courses are Private ( Discraft Ranch in Holly, Blue Gill in Wayland and Flip City in Shelby, for example). These sit on large, beautiful parcels and have no need to cross fairways to allow for variety. Still, if such a course were mine, I would have no hesitancy to design "safari" variations for times when the playing field was small.
I have a buddy who has an 18 hole course on his property, I don't remember how many acres it is, but he does have two alternates and a reverse look...so a combo of 54 holes. We have 4 tourneys a year there in Homer, AK. If any of you come up to Alaska, this would be one place to visit. It challenges you in every possible way, although I haven't really seen a good place for rollers on too many holes, but I'm sure the advanced and above could make something happen.
Multiple tees cause you have a course thats totally diff. utilizing a variety of shots/looks. Round tees can be fun too cause you can throw in any direction. We put round tees in at the school where I teach and they r nice.
What is the diameter of the round tees?
10 ft and happy with them. They are a bigger "footprint" at the tee area than the traditional tee but it just made sense teaching kids etc. to have additional options to throw to any available basket now and then. We are also setting up "round nine" where there are 9 designated putting spots around one basket near the first tee. The locations will be marked with brick inlaid in the ground with character traits on the brick. It's a putting race to see who can make it through the nine locations first. Many players can do this all at once. Anyway, I loved the idea of a pemanent basket available for putting practice etc. A friend Marty Cook gave us these ideas. Our school course definitely needs more character added to it though. Any ideas you could share would appreciated.

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