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We are looking for a cost effective way to build an island. There is no water we would just like to build up the ground to have a definitive line for IB/OB. Anyone got any ideas

Tags: Building, Course, Island

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Sounds like a railroad tie wall would suit you well.
I used meduim sized rocks that were already on the property in a similar situation. Just placed them in a 10m radius circle around the basket every few feet and, presto, instant island hole!!!...very simple and works well.
At the Gentlemen's Club Challenge they used haybales. A semi-circle in front of the island alternating between one and two high. The basket was on a two-high stack. Very effective and a little intimidating in the wind.
There is a question whether the island should have a raised wall/edge/outer barrier at all.

If price were no object and a true island were created by digging a moat or lake around the green then the outer edges would not be raised.

A raised wall which completely surrounds the island is an obstacle to the front edge (making the shot harder since a shot cannot land outside and slide into the safety of the island) but a protection to the back edge, blocking a shot from sliding out. It also raises the luck factor since some discs which land well short of the island skip or bounce over the barrier, while a better looking shot (and much closer to the intended route) lands at the base of the wall and is kept out.


At the USDGC, where the artificial island concept debuted in our game, they have used hay bales to form part of the circle but water's edge to complete the circle. The tee pad placement has been changed through the years, so the water's edge has been behind the basket or to one side.

At White's Acres (a private course in Milford, Michigan) the island hole was first made out of raised string and has now been replaced with painted bricks, dug in so they are flat with the ground and create now raised barrier at all. This is not only a permanent, definitive and inexpensive option but relatively easy to install. It works well except in deep snow which by custom we play without OB in those conditions.
There is a question whether the island should have a raised wall/edge/outer barrier at all.

If price were no object and a true island were created by digging a moat or lake around the green then the outer edges would not be raised.

A raised wall which completely surrounds the island is an obstacle to the front edge (making the shot harder since a shot cannot land outside and slide into the safety of the island) but a protection to the back edge, blocking a shot from sliding out. It also raises the luck factor since some discs which land well short of the island skip or bounce over the barrier, while a better looking shot (and much closer to the intended route) lands at the base of the wall and is kept out.


At the USDGC, where the artificial island concept debuted in our game, they have used hay bales to form part of the circle but water's edge to complete the circle. The tee pad placement has been changed through the years, so the water's edge has been behind the basket or to one side.

At White's Acres (a private course in Milford, Michigan) the island hole was first made out of raised string and has now been replaced with painted bricks, dug in so they are flat with the ground and create now raised barrier at all. This is not only a permanent, definitive and inexpensive option but relatively easy to install. It works well except in deep snow which by custom we play without OB in those conditions.
There is a question whether the island should have a raised wall/edge/outer barrier at all.

If price were no object and a true island were created by digging a moat or lake around the green then the outer edges would not be raised.

A raised wall which completely surrounds the island is an obstacle to the front edge (making the shot harder since a shot cannot land outside and slide into the safety of the island) but a protection to the back edge, blocking a shot from sliding out. It also raises the luck factor since some discs which land well short of the island skip or bounce over the barrier, while a better looking shot (and much closer to the intended route) lands at the base of the wall and is kept out.


At the USDGC, where the artificial island concept debuted in our game, they have used hay bales to form part of the circle but water's edge to complete the circle. The tee pad placement has been changed through the years, so the water's edge has been behind the basket or to one side.

At White's Acres (a private course in Milford, Michigan) the island hole was first made out of raised string and has now been replaced with painted bricks, dug in so they are flat with the ground and create no raised barrier at all. This is not only a permanent, definitive and inexpensive option but relatively easy to install. It works well except in deep snow which by custom we play without OB in those conditions.
Either Mark's drunk or this site is up to it's usual shenanigans ;o))
Sorry for the mess of those two responses above.

The edit and cancel tools at this website are either not working like they used to or are beyond my understanding.
They's broke
I played an island hole in Soda Springs ID ( great course! par 64 ) that was basically a long piece of sheet metal about three feet high, formed into a ring like a cookie cutter, welded and filled with dirt. The island was about a 20 foot radius, and was not surrounded by OB. It was more of a putting challenge. A setup like this for an Island in OB would still bring a lot of the luck factor, but also challenge you to keep you disc on top.
I plan on making an island at my school course by insetting bricks flush to the ground every 3 yards to form my 30 foot circle.
The bricks make it an island shot then by permanently designating the 30ft circle vs. it being an actual built up island. Really cost effective, still an island, and challenging on a shorter hole.
On our practice course we used 1/2" pvc. Just decide the size of your island, and loop the pvc. We used 200' of pipe, put the basket in the center, and it gives you 10 meters, or 32 feet all the way around. 100 feet of pipe would give you a 30' diameter island, or 15' around the basket. It isn't to high, but it gives you a very definitive border. And it is fairly inexpensive, (around $1.50 for a 10' length).

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