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I'm fairly new and still play more or less a three disc game (distance driver, Putter and sometimes a midrange_, It has worked well but i have stopped forward progress... I hear all the name brand arguments and all that, i'm more curious how to choose what types of discs to start buying and when to throw what types of discs....... HELP....

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Over stable to under stable works for me. I like to let the disc do the work.
Disc nut kinda put it like how I and most disc golfers. I have overstable to understable. I've selected my discs by trial and error. If I had some extra cash I'd go to Play It Again Sports and pick from some of the used discs and eventually settled on what drivers and weights I liked. I kinda stuck with what discs I know best but it's still fun to try out discs without having to add them to your arsenal.
I've been playing about 7 months now, and the discs that i throw are Nate Doss Surges, Pulse, Force and Flashes for drivers ( I mainly throw sidearm), and APX for putt.
The APX is rated 0,0 ( which means it flies straight if thrown flat) it is a great confidence booster when learning how to putt. These three discs are Discraft, and that's about all I throw. You will have to decide for yourself which brand/brands you like on your own.
The main thing I would tell you about disc selection is; Stick with a disc for a while and try to figure it out. Don't be too quick to dismiss a disc after just a few throws.
The best thing you can do to improve your game is play with good players and ask questions!!!! Most likely they will be happy to help. Above all.... Practice, practice, practice!!!
Like I said I'm new to the sport as well, but these tips have helped me along the way and I hope they help you as well.
Good luck and have fun!!!
http://www.innovadiscs.com/faq/index.html#Discs1
http://www.discraft.com/dghelp.html
Both great starter links for what disc's to throw and why for new players.

Another good link is this. It shows the flight ratings for pretty much every disc.
http://www.marshallstreetdiscgolf.com/disc_golf_flightguide.html

Ultimately what you carry in your bag is your call. I personally like flx plastic and the xl. It took me way to many disc's to figure this out. I started buying what the top pro's use. I clearly didn’t have the snap or skill to throw them. In the long run its nice to have a large selection of disc's but if you don’t use 2/3's of them its kind of a waste of money.

Now on to your question "how to choose what types of discs to start buying and when to throw what types of discs.."
Personally, I am have only been playing since about oct, I try to throw flat and level on almost ever shot and try to use the natural fade of the disc. I have a couple disc's that are more overstable and a few that are more understable. I use the soft magnet for putting but have read great things about the apx. I think that trying a couple of the basic disc's that discraft and innova suggest would be a good way to start expanding your progress. I would also suggest you feeling out some of the different types of plastic out there. If you feel your beyond the starter disc's use the marshall street guide and manufacture’s website to see if the disc could work for what you need in your game.

One last thing is Form make sure you have great form. That’s one of the first things and greatest things I have learned.
It's all about what is available to you. When I started out, I could only find Innova in the stores, cause I llike instant gratification. I spend the money, I wanna throw it right away! So that is what I learned to throw. Since, I have been throwing more Discraft also. I am not brand loyal, so what works, use it! Some suggestions: Innova- Valkryie, Sidewinder, Beast(understable) Wraith, Orc(stable)T-rex, Destroyer, Boss(overstable) Discraft- Avenger, Predator. I'm not much help with Discraft, but I bet some here can answer any questions. Oh yea, putter: Pro-RHYNO!!!
I generally point new players to less stable plastic. Without knowing you power, form and/or mechanics.

In Innova stuff that would be a low 170's Champion Sidewinder or maybe a Star Roadrunner in the same weight range...Midrange, a DX Classic Roc...high 160's low 170's.

Putters, whatever you choose you should have at least three or more for warming up and practicing. I have mostly putted with Classic Roc's throughout my career..I did recently...about 6 months ago switch to a ss Magic. I use both types to warm up...But rely more on a Magic during a round for putts and short approaches.
All depends on what three discs you're already carrying. Personally, I'd ignore any and all advice touting specific discs until you know what shots you are trying to accomplish for which you don't have an adequate disc already.

To keep it simple, you have the three basic categories: putter, mid, driver. And you have the three basic stability classes: under, stable, and over. That creates nine essential roles in your arsenal for your discs. Depending on your own skill/style, some of those roles can be filled by a single disc.

For example, you can usually get away with a single putter, especially if you are only putting with it and not making longer approaches or even short drives with it. Further, if you are equally comfortable throwing backhand and sidearm, then perhaps you can utilize one or two discs to handle left and right turns of any distance. You'd just switch shot style to fit your need rather than disc.

Personally, I think what you want to do is start with by filling the stable roles first. Then as you develop your skills to a point where those discs act more understable, you fill in new stable discs. And so on...
Weight is important, if you are just starting u will needs lighter discs they will be easier to turn over or keep straight as you get a stronger throw you will need heavier discs, all disc fly different and suit different people all i can say is try them all
innovas beast is a great driver
a putter is a putter just get what feels comfortable
and you cant go past a roc (classic roc) for a midrange
and just get different weights to get different flight patterns
Disc nut said:
Over stable to under stable works for me. I like to let the disc do the work.

amen sister.
JC said:
All depends on what three discs you're already carrying. Personally, I'd ignore any and all advice touting specific discs until you know what shots you are trying to accomplish for which you don't have an adequate disc already.

To keep it simple, you have the three basic categories: putter, mid, driver. And you have the three basic stability classes: under, stable, and over. That creates nine essential roles in your arsenal for your discs. Depending on your own skill/style, some of those roles can be filled by a single disc.

For example, you can usually get away with a single putter, especially if you are only putting with it and not making longer approaches or even short drives with it. Further, if you are equally comfortable throwing backhand and sidearm, then perhaps you can utilize one or two discs to handle left and right turns of any distance. You'd just switch shot style to fit your need rather than disc.

Personally, I think what you want to do is start with by filling the stable roles first. Then as you develop your skills to a point where those discs act more understable, you fill in new stable discs. And so on...

I might be putting words in JC's mouth, but here when they said stable, I think he means a straight flying disc, not understable (turning to the right for a right handed backhand throw) and overstable (fading left for the same throw mentioned).

If that is what they meant, then I agree all the way with their advice. Don't be blown by every breeze of someone suggesting specific discs. In that area you can waste a lot of money. My advice there is trying someone else's discs before you buy the latest and greatest.

My parting shot: learn how to a throw a putter off of the tee and on approaches...then build your game around this shot. You will drop strokes if you put in the effort, not only because the margin on error is smaller with the putter throw, but because to throw a putter well, you have to be smooth and that will benefit your entire game. This spring when I got out, I have a gameplan: get the putter throw dialed in, then the roc (midrange game), then, and only then will I start practicing drives. I encourage you to build this base as well.
Okay, I reread JC's post and yes, that looks like what they meant...sorry about that JC...I just wanted to clarify that point.
JC said:

To keep it simple, you have the three basic categories: putter, mid, driver. And you have the three basic stability classes: under, stable, and over. That creates nine essential roles in your arsenal for your discs. Depending on your own skill/style, some of those roles can be filled by a single disc.



!@#$%^&*()_)(*&^%!@#$%^&*()_+_)(*&^@#$%^&*()_


Par420,
You probably haven't stopped forward progress (unless you have stopped playing and practicing) you probably have just hit a plateau. One way you expand your skills is by learning new ways to make shots, including using different discs.

I think JC had it right. There are three different flights and three different distances you need to control. With enough skill you could accomplish any of those shots with one disc. Unfortunately we don't have infinite skill.

We use tools to make jobs easier. The better adapted the tool to the job the easier the job becomes. So you could eventually build a house with a pocket knife. The proper tools make it much easier.

The right disc just makes the shot easier to throw. The right disc increases the margin of error. But even a perfect tool for a job doesn't work well unless we know how to use it.

As a new player your first concern should be to learn how to throw flat and clean-that means developing good basic form. There are lots of videos of good players throwing. Try to mimic the style of a good player as a starting point. Or find a good player at your local course and ask them to look at your form.

As a new player you should be quickly improving. The basics of the game are not that difficult to pick up once your form allows you to throw flat and clean. When you can throw down the middle of the fairway with good glide then you need to learn the discs and adjustments which allow you to bend the disc as needed.

Most new players find relatively understable discs easier to control. An overstable disc is like a sledgehammer too heavy to pick up for most beginners. Most players have to work their way into learning to use overstable discs.

Nine basic shots: straight, right and left: short, medium and long. Nine basic discs.

Then there are the trick shots. Don't worry about those for a while.

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